Coming to the defense of the persecuted is noble and not bullying

On Friday, December 27, 2019, a resolution titled “Situation of human rights of Rohingya Muslims and other minorities in Myanmar” was passed with an overwhelming majority of votes during the 74th session of UN General Assembly at its 52nd resumed meeting, held at the UN headquarters in New York. This resolution follows the UN’s Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar report (dated 22 October 2019) that declared Myanmar is failing in its obligations under the Genocide Convention to prevent, investigate and enact effective legislation criminalizing and punishing genocide.

Continue reading “Coming to the defense of the persecuted is noble and not bullying”

Bias and Prejudice Die Hard

By Habib Siddiqui

I was shocked to read Kanbawza Win’s latest posting in the Asian Tribune. Once again, he reveals his appalling bias and prejudice against the Rohingyas of Myanmar, who remain the most persecuted people in our time. As a hardcore racist that he is, his latest rant doesn’t surprise me at all, and should not surprise his readers either who have seen in the past such samples of his degenerated and delusional mind that cannot separate facts from fiction.
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When hatred becomes extreme

By Dr. Habib Siddiqui

Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk, wrote, “When fear becomes collective, when anger becomes collective, it’s extremely dangerous. It is overwhelming… The mass media and the military-industrial complex create a prison for us, so we continue to think, see, and act in the same way… We need the courage to express ourselves even when the majority is going in the opposite direction… because a change of direction can happen only when there is a collective awakening… Therefore, it is very important to say, ‘I am here!’ to those who share the same kind of insight.” [The Art of Power] Continue reading “When hatred becomes extreme”

Whither Suu Kyi’s Government?

By Habib Siddiqui

The NLD party declared last week that Aung San Suu Kyi will be foreign minister in Myanmar’s first civilian government for decades. The constitution, drafted and approved by the powerful military, had blocked her from becoming the presidency. Nonetheless, she vowed to rule above the man picked as president, Htin Kyaw, in the government which comes to power next week in the former army-ruled nation.
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Who is actual Threat for the Nation

By Aman Ullah

“The prince must be a lion, but he must also know how to play the fox. He who wishes to deceive will never fail to find willing dupes. The prince, in short, ought not to quit good courses if he can help it, but should know how to follow evil courses if he must” [FROM THE PRINCE – MACHIAVELLI]

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Correcting the false narrative of the Ma Ba Tha

By Habib Siddiqui

Wirathu and his band of criminal Buddhist monks have hijacked Buddhism and poisoned the political discourse inside Myanmar. Ma Ba Tha uses the news of the rape and murder of a Rakhine woman allegedly by Rohingya Muslims in Arakan in 2012 to paint a very damning picture of the divide between “us” and “them”. And such a nasty propaganda, a false one, which I must remind our readers, has worked because people are always willing to believe the worst about one’s enemies if they are programmed as such.
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Are these people really citizens of Burma?

By Aman Ullah

“Every national and every person born of parents, both of whom are indigenous nationals are citizens by birth. Even though they are Kachin, Kayah, Kayin, Chin, Burma, Mon, Rakhine and Shan, they are not national races if they permanently live in other countries, not in Myanmar. Same national races who have settled in Myanmar after 1824 are not indigenous races. So they are not citizens by birth. The law also states that national races who acquire citizenship of other countries and persons born of parents, both of whom are those foreign citizens cannot become Myanmar citizens,” Section-5, of 1982 Citizenship Law,

There was a legendary love story which albeit ending in a tragic estrangement , between a police officer Diraj Bhattacharya and Ma Thin, daughter of a local Rakhine landlord, during British period.

ma-thein-wall

LOVE SYMBOL PRESERVED: This well at Teknaf in Cox’s Bazar district serves as a remembrance of the legendary love, albeit ending in a tragic estrangement, between then police officer Diraj Bhattacharya and Ma Thin, daughter of a local Rakhine landlord, during the British period.
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Burma and Human security

By Aman Ullah

“Human beings, the world over, need freedom and security that they may be able to realize their full potential.”   Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

Organized society is, perhaps, primarily the product of mankind’s search of security of life and property. No people leave their traditional hearths and homes unless there is a serious threat to their personal security. For decades, wave after wave of Burmese refugees have fled war and oppression in their native land to seek uncertain exile in neighboring countries. The toll in human suffering is in calculable, and the continual mass migrations have created serious regional disruptions and tensions.
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Myanmar and Washington lobbyists

By Aman Ullah

The government of Myanmar has hired lobbyists in Washington for the first time in more than a decade, signing a contract worth US$840,000 (K840 million) with the Podesta Group,  a powerful US lobbying firm, to represent its interests in Washington, reports The Hill, which covers US politics, on April 16.
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What is happening against Muslims in Burma?

By Fayas Ahmed

The recent anti-Muslim violence in Mandalay that claimed two dead and many injured, in addition to colossal damages to the Muslim properties, has caused growing fear and consternation amongst the country’s Muslim communities. Round the clock senses of utter insecurity and abject haplessness on the part of the Muslims are prevalent in this holy month of Ramadan. Of the two dead one was a Buddhist named U Tun Tun and the other a Muslim namely U Soe Min alias Mohamed Noor. Both of them were killed by Buddhists. U Soe Min was attacked and killed in the early morning while he was going to mosque for morning payer, according to a local Muslim named U Hla Myint (not real name) on condition of anonymity. Continue reading “What is happening against Muslims in Burma?”